What Sea Level Rise Will Do To Famous American Sites | Climate crisis

Land, on which 10% of the world’s population live, could be lost to sea level rise if trends in CO2 emissions continue, new maps and visualizations show.

Fifty major cities, mostly in Asia, and at least one major nation on every continent except Australia and Antarctica are at risk. Many small island states are threatened with the almost complete loss of their land.

The collection of images and videos produced by the non-profit climate control center visualizes future sea level rise if the world does not meet the emissions reduction targets. The images show which areas of the world can be saved and which could be lost, and take with them the heritage and history of these coastal communities.

Achieving the most ambitious goals of the Paris Agreement could reduce exposure to sea level rise by around half. But the world is not on track to limit global warming to 1.5 ° C (2.7 ° F) as set out in the 2015 Paris Agreement. Based on current emissions, the earth is expected to reach and exceed 3 ° C (5.4 ° F) of warming by 2100.

Houston Space Center, today

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Houston Space Center, + 1.5C

POF USA TX Houston Space Center Houston L13 1p5C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

Houston Space Center, + 3C

POF USA TX Houston Space Center Houston L13 3p0C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

The researchers’ projections show that cities in California, Texas, Florida, Louisiana, as well as many cities on the east coast, will see a sharp rise in sea level in the coming centuries.

“In this case, a picture says 1,000 words or 1,000 years,” said the main author of the paper, Benjamin Strauss. Strauss is CEO and Senior Scientist at Climate Central. While it will take centuries to reach the dire scenarios of underwater cities, the actions taken now and in the decades to come will determine how much of the coast will be lost in the future.

Next month, representatives from all over the world will meet in Glasgow for the Cop26 climate conference, where parties are expected to commit to goals in response to the ongoing climate emergency.

“The decisions we make in Glasgow and the actions we take this decade will have an impact for hundreds and thousands of years,” said Strauss. “This group will be remembered for their choice: did you choose a prosperous future with a livable climate or did you choose to drown the coastal towns of the world?”

Santa Monica Pier, today

POF USA CA Santa Monica Santa Monica Pier L13 available Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

Santa Monica Pier, + 1.5 ° C

POF USA CA Santa Monica Santa Monica Pier L13 1p5C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

Santa Monica Pier, + 3C

POF USA CA Santa Monica Santa Monica Pier L13 3p0C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

The researchers applied various warming scenarios to determine where communities are most at risk over the next 200 to 2,000 years.

“We have seen sea levels rise by about a foot in the last century,” said Strauss. “Looking ahead, we’re talking 10 feet at best and 30 feet at worst.” % of the world’s population live.

Once emitted, carbon dioxide remains in the atmosphere for centuries. The carbon that is already in the atmosphere is currently warming the planet by 1.1 ° C – which means that even without net emissions after 2020, global mean sea level will rise by around 1.9 meters (6.2 feet ) will increase.

Washington DC Lincoln Memorial, today

POF USA DC Washington DC Lincoln Memorial L13 present blank Composed: climate control center

Washington DC Lincoln Memorial, +1.5 ° C

POF USA DC Washington DC Lincoln Memorial L13 1p5C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

Washington DC Lincoln Memorial, +3 C.

POF USA DC Washington DC Lincoln Memorial L13 3p0C Unlabeled Composed: climate control center

“It’s probably easier for people to think of sea level rise as a problem that can be solved, or that we can schedule a certain fixed sea level rise,” Strauss said. “But the truth is, we have moved from a world with stable sea levels to a world where it is continually marching upwards.”

Current measures to adapt to sea level rise include relocation to higher areas and defense, which includes protecting coastal wetlands, beaches, dunes and oyster beds, elevating structures and building dykes. The adjustment implemented today, says Strauss, is not an end point or a solution, but rather a step on a long way.

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